PrintIsagenix Offers More Predictable Weight Loss, Researchers Report

UIC researchers say subjects lost weight more easily and consistently on Isagenix.

UIC researchers say subjects lost weight more easily and consistently on Isagenix.

Losing weight is easier and more consistent on a weekly basis when using an Isagenix system as compared to normal dieting, according to University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) researchers.

The authors of the award-winning UIC study involving Isagenix products discussed their findings early last week during the American Society for Nutrition’s Scientific Sessions annual meeting at the Experimental Biology conference in Boston.

“The subjects’ weight loss was more predictable on Isagenix products over the course of the study,” said graduate student Cynthia Kroeger, who was listed as the first author on the open-access paper published in Nutrition & Metabolism.

Kroeger shared that the total reductions in body weight, body fat, and visceral fat (sub-abdominal fat) by the end of the 10-week study in subjects in the Isagenix group were also greater in comparison to the subjects in the group following a “heart healthy” diet.

The greater reduction in visceral fat found in the Isagenix group versus the “heart healthy” diet group was particularly remarkable, Kroeger said. She explained that the reason is because visceral fat is linked to the production of several markers related to insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk.

The study found, in summary, that Isagenix products led to a 56 percent greater reduction in average weight loss, 47 percent greater reduction in average body fat loss, twice as much visceral fat loss, and 35 percent greater reduction of oxidative stress markers related to cardiovascular risk.

Graduate student Monica Klempel added that the subjects on the Isagenix system also found staying on the Isagenix products much easier than complying to the “heart healthy” diet. Klempel, who is listed as the first author on the open-access paper published in Nutrition Journal, participated directly in helping subjects of both groups stay in compliance over the duration of the study.

She said that the subjects found the Isagenix products such as IsaLean Shake unexpectedly enjoyable despite its 240 calories. “They found the shakes surprisingly satisfying and filling,” she said.

Both of the graduate students also expressed their delight in finding out that their study received national recognition at the conference. “They referred to the winners as the ‘best of the best’ as far as sound science and applicability to the obesity epidemic goals,” Kroeger said.

The study’s poster was one of six winners of the Obesity Research Interest Section of which is the largest section within ASN’s interest sections. The winners of the section also were selected to present their research at the conference.

Krista Varady, the lead author of the study, said that she was pleased that the study won in because of the fierceness of the competition. “It’s very impressive,” she said.