Workout Burnout? The RISE Protocol Can Help!

2018-08-06T10:18:56+00:00 January 26th, 2018|Athlete Nutrition, Energy, Nutrient Timing, Protein, Vitality + Well-Being|

Have you ever looked at the current recommendations for exercise and felt overwhelmed? To meet these guidelines, it would take working out for at least an hour a day – seven days a week.

The benefits of exercise are well documented; however, the all-or-nothing mentality is a factor that may hinder folks from even starting to exercise. Feeling overwhelmed or not knowing where to start can derail an otherwise successful weight loss regimen.

One way to reach your fitness goals is by adopting Dr. Paul Arciero’s RISE Protocol. Resistance (R), Interval (I), Stretching (S), and Endurance (E) is a scientifically backed exercise program that incorporates several methods of exercise throughout the week to better achieve those goals (1-3). Instead of jumping on the treadmill or elliptical for an hour every day, RISE is based on the premise of only four days of exercise each week, alternating the type of exercise each day. Compared to the seven days required to fit in all recommendations by most health agencies, the RISE program integrates all aspects of the guidelines into a varied training regimen that people are likely to continue.

Not only are the workouts varied each day, but research also shows that rest days are just as important. The RISE protocol also includes scheduled rest days to help the body recuperate and recharge.

R – Resistance

Each resistance training session should last about an hour and incorporate strength exercises to work the whole body. Each session should include two sets of 10-15 repetitions at an intensity or weight that causes muscular fatigue as well as a dynamic warmup and cooldown. Resistance training sessions should be completed at 70 to 90 percent max effort, or a seven to nine on an intensity scale of one to 10.

I – Intervals

Interval sprint training sessions can include exercises such as running, biking, or swimming. They should consist of five to seven sets of 30 seconds of all-out effort followed by four minutes of active recovery. Each interval session should take less than 45 minutes to complete.

S – Stretching

Total body stretching, flexibility, and strengthening exercises including yoga or Pilates movements should be performed for about an hour. Stretching sessions are a way to incorporate movements for flexibility and balance that may otherwise not be part of your regular routine.

E – Endurance

Endurance training sessions should consist of exercises such as cycling, jogging, cross-country skiing, or swimming. Each session should be completed at a moderate pace, at roughly 60 percent max effort, for at least an hour.

Example of RISE Protocol

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Resistance Intervals Rest Day Stretching Endurance
≤60 minutes ≤45 minutes 60 minutes ≥60 minutes
2 sets per exercise 5-7 sets Yoga, Pilates, etc. Cycling, jogging, walking, swimming, cross-country skiing, elliptical, etc.
10-15 reps per set 30 seconds all out + 4 minutes active rest

When added to an Isagenix lifestyle that incorporates protein pacing, the RISE protocol becomes PRISE. The addition of protein pacing, or ingesting 20-40 grams high quality protein every three to four hours, is scientifically proven to promote better results than the RISE protocol alone (1).

References

  1. Arciero PJ, Ives SJ, Norton C, et al. Protein-pacing and multi-component exercise training improves physical performance outcomes in exercise-trained women: the PRISE 3 study. Nutrients. 1 June 2016; 8: 332. doi: 10.3390/nu8060332.
  2. Arciero PJ, Edmonds RC, Bunsawat K, et al. Protein-pacing from food or supplementation improves physical performance in overweight men and women: the PRISE 2 study. Nutrients. 11 May 2016; 8(5): 288.
  3. Arciero PJ, Baur D, Connelly S, and Ormsbee MJ. Timed-daily ingestion of whey protein and exercise training reduces visceral adipose tissue mass and improves insulin resistance: the PRISE study. J Appl Physiol. 15 May 2014; 117: 1-10. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00152.2014.